[:nl]On Monday of the past week, Eugénie left Bobo Dioulasso to go back to The Netherlands. For me I have one more week left in Burkina Faso.
It is the period of harvest in the villages. It has started with the peanuts and the beans, followed by the cotton, corn and sorghum, last will be sesame. A large percentage of the crops is lost between the field and the granary. All the harvest is done by hand and transported home either on the heads of the women or in small carts with donkeys. Already there starts the loss of goods. Most of the harvested products need to dry in the sun and very few farmers have a good way to protect their crops against possible rains. The farmers do not invest in equipment (just some tarpaulins) and after a lot of work to get something out of the fields they lose a large part of the proceeds of their work.
blog-27-oct-2013-1
Tuesday we went to the village of Bona. The leaders had to restitute the discussions and decisions taken earlier in a meeting in Bobo.
There was a lot of people awaiting us, which was nice. However the leaders did not restitute very well what was done in Bobo Dioulasso. It is like they were afraid of talking about honesty, transparency, speaking the truth… We did not really understand the difficulty, since in previous villages it went very well. One of the projects they have been asking help for since over 4 years is the construction of a medical center. The embassy of Japan in Burkina might be able to help and for this we needed to have official documents for the piece of land where this medical center was to be built. This meant to have surveyors plotting the land and a discussion with the village. May be the expectation to have this medical center and awaiting the news during our meeting kind of blocked them for other discussions.
blog-27-oct-2013-2
On Friday of the same week we had to go back to Bona with the Japanese consultant and show him the land and other realizations in the village (school, maison de la femme).
blog-27-oct-2013-3

blog-27-oct-2013-4 blog-27-oct-2013-5

blog-27-oct-2013-6
blog-27-oct-2013-8
The big green fruits in the background are calabashes.
blog-27-oct-2013-9
Umeda, from the Japanese Embassy in Burkina, in front of one of the limits of the land given by the village for the medical center.
We should have a final decision on the possibility to get funds from them by the end of February 2014.
blog-27-oct-2013-10
While we were walking in the fields, we found 2 little partridges. We let them go hoping their mother will find them. On the way back we stopped at a medical dispensary in the village of Sogosagasso. I have never seen anything this dirty.
Saturday morning we went with Umeda to visit 2 medical dispensaries (fortunately, these were very clean) and we made a quick tour of the LAP.
On Wednesday we went back to the village of Fina. We had to install some shelves at the nursery school and the tailors had to take the measurements of the kids for their uniforms.
blog-27-oct-2013-11

The 77 kids of the nursery school of Fina

blog-27-oct-2013-12 blog-27-oct-2013-13
Boys being measured Girls being measured

blog-27-oct-2013-14

Kids using the playground

Also on Saturday we went to the Muslim baptism of the daughter of Karim, manager of the agricultural social business.

blog-27-oct-2013-15 blog-27-oct-2013-16

blog-27-oct-2013-17

Mother, daughter and father smiling
African proverb:
A fool and water will go the way they are steered.
Un imbécile et l’eau iront de la façon qu’ils sont dirigés.
Have an excellent week.
Hervé[:en]

On Monday of the past week, Eugénie left Bobo Dioulasso to go back to The Netherlands. For me I have one more week left in Burkina Faso.

It is the period of harvest in the villages. It has started with the peanuts and the beans, followed by the cotton, corn and sorghum, last will be sesame. A large percentage of the crops is lost between the field and the granary. All the harvest is done by hand and transported home either on the heads of the women or in small carts with donkeys. Already there starts the loss of goods. Most of the harvested products need to dry in the sun and very few farmers have a good way to protect their crops against possible rains. The farmers do not invest in equipment (just some tarpaulins) and after a lot of work to get something out of the fields they lose a large part of the proceeds of their work.

blog-27-oct-2013-1

Tuesday we went to the village of Bona. The leaders had to restitute the discussions and decisions taken earlier in a meeting in Bobo.

There was a lot of people awaiting us, which was nice. However the leaders did not restitute very well what was done in Bobo Dioulasso. It is like they were afraid of talking about honesty, transparency, speaking the truth… We did not really understand the difficulty, since in previous villages it went very well. One of the projects they have been asking help for since over 4 years is the construction of a medical center. The embassy of Japan in Burkina might be able to help and for this we needed to have official documents for the piece of land where this medical center was to be built. This meant to have surveyors plotting the land and a discussion with the village. May be the expectation to have this medical center and awaiting the news during our meeting kind of blocked them for other discussions.

blog-27-oct-2013-2

On Friday of the same week we had to go back to Bona with the Japanese consultant and show him the land and other realizations in the village (school, maison de la femme).

blog-27-oct-2013-3

blog-27-oct-2013-4 blog-27-oct-2013-5

blog-27-oct-2013-6

blog-27-oct-2013-8

The big green fruits in the background are calabashes.

blog-27-oct-2013-9

Umeda, from the Japanese Embassy in Burkina, in front of one of the limits of the land given by the village for the medical center.

We should have a final decision on the possibility to get funds from them by the end of February 2014.

blog-27-oct-2013-10

While we were walking in the fields, we found 2 little partridges. We let them go hoping their mother will find them. On the way back we stopped at a medical dispensary in the village of Sogosagasso. I have never seen anything this dirty.

Saturday morning we went with Umeda to visit 2 medical dispensaries (fortunately, these were very clean) and we made a quick tour of the LAP.

On Wednesday we went back to the village of Fina. We had to install some shelves at the nursery school and the tailors had to take the measurements of the kids for their uniforms.

blog-27-oct-2013-11

The 77 kids of the nursery school of Fina

blog-27-oct-2013-12 blog-27-oct-2013-13
Boys being measured Girls being measured

blog-27-oct-2013-14

Kids using the playground

Also on Saturday we went to the Muslim baptism of the daughter of Karim, manager of the agricultural social business.

blog-27-oct-2013-15 blog-27-oct-2013-16

blog-27-oct-2013-17

Mother, daughter and father smiling

African proverb:

A fool and water will go the way they are steered.

Un imbécile et l’eau iront de la façon qu’ils sont dirigés.

Have an excellent week.

Hervé

[:fr]

On Monday of the past week, Eugénie left Bobo Dioulasso to go back to The Netherlands. For me I have one more week left in Burkina Faso.

It is the period of harvest in the villages. It has started with the peanuts and the beans, followed by the cotton, corn and sorghum, last will be sesame. A large percentage of the crops is lost between the field and the granary. All the harvest is done by hand and transported home either on the heads of the women or in small carts with donkeys. Already there starts the loss of goods. Most of the harvested products need to dry in the sun and very few farmers have a good way to protect their crops against possible rains. The farmers do not invest in equipment (just some tarpaulins) and after a lot of work to get something out of the fields they lose a large part of the proceeds of their work.

blog-27-oct-2013-1

Tuesday we went to the village of Bona. The leaders had to restitute the discussions and decisions taken earlier in a meeting in Bobo.

There was a lot of people awaiting us, which was nice. However the leaders did not restitute very well
what was done in Bobo Dioulasso. It is like they were afraid of talking about honesty, transparency, speaking the truth… We did not really understand the difficulty, since in previous villages it went very well. One of the projects they have been asking help for since over 4 years is the construction of a medical center. The embassy of Japan in Burkina might be able to help and for this we needed to have official documents for the piece of land where this medical center was to be built. This meant to have surveyors plotting the land and a discussion with the village. May be the expectation to have this medical center and awaiting the news during our meeting kind of blocked them for other discussions.

blog-27-oct-2013-2

On Friday of the same week we had to go back to Bona with the Japanese consultant and show him the land and other realizations in the village (school, maison de la femme).

blog-27-oct-2013-3

blog-27-oct-2013-4 blog-27-oct-2013-5

blog-27-oct-2013-6

blog-27-oct-2013-8

The big green fruits in the background are calabashes.

blog-27-oct-2013-9

Umeda, from the Japanese Embassy in Burkina, in front of one of the limits of the land given by the village for the medical center.

We should have a final decision on the possibility to get funds from them by the end of February 2014.

blog-27-oct-2013-10

While we were walking in the fields, we found 2 little partridges. We let them go hoping their mother will find them. On the way back we stopped at a medical dispensary in the village of Sogosagasso. I have never seen anything this dirty.

Saturday morning we went with Umeda to visit 2 medical dispensaries (fortunately, these were very clean) and we made a quick tour of the LAP.

On Wednesday we went back to the village of Fina. We had to install some shelves at the nursery school and the tailors had to take the measurements of the kids for their uniforms.

blog-27-oct-2013-11

The 77 kids of the nursery school of Fina

blog-27-oct-2013-12 blog-27-oct-2013-13
Boys being measured Girls being measured

blog-27-oct-2013-14

Kids using the playground

Also on Saturday we went to the Muslim baptism of the daughter of Karim, manager of the agricultural social business.

blog-27-oct-2013-15 blog-27-oct-2013-16

blog-27-oct-2013-17

Mother, daughter and father smiling

African proverb:

A fool and water will go the way they are steered.

Un imbécile et l’eau iront de la façon qu’ils sont dirigés.

Have an excellent week.

Hervé

[:de]

On Monday of the past week, Eugénie left Bobo Dioulasso to go back to The Netherlands. For me I have one more week left in Burkina Faso.

It is the period of harvest in the villages. It has started with the peanuts and the beans, followed by the cotton, corn and sorghum, last will be sesame. A large percentage of the crops is lost between the field and the granary. All the harvest is done by hand and transported home either on the heads of the women or in small carts with donkeys. Already there starts the loss of goods. Most of the harvested products need to dry in the sun and very few farmers have a good way to protect their crops against possible rains. The farmers do not invest in equipment (just some tarpaulins) and after a lot of work to get something out of the fields they lose a large part of the proceeds of their work.

blog-27-oct-2013-1

Tuesday we went to the village of Bona. The leaders had to restitute the discussions and decisions taken earlier in a meeting in Bobo.

There was a lot of people awaiting us, which was nice. However the leaders did not restitute very well what was done in Bobo Dioulasso. It is like they were afraid of talking about honesty, transparency, speaking the truth… We did not really understand the difficulty, since in previous villages it went very well. One of the projects they have been asking help for since over 4 years is the construction of a medical center. The embassy of Japan in Burkina might be able to help and for this we needed to have official documents for the piece of land where this medical center was to be built. This meant to have surveyors plotting the land and a discussion with the village. May be the expectation to have this medical center and awaiting the news during our meeting kind of blocked them for other discussions.

blog-27-oct-2013-2

On Friday of the same week we had to go back to Bona with the Japanese consultant and show him the land and other realizations in the village (school, maison de la femme).

blog-27-oct-2013-3

blog-27-oct-2013-4 blog-27-oct-2013-5

blog-27-oct-2013-6

blog-27-oct-2013-8

The big green fruits in the background are calabashes.

blog-27-oct-2013-9

Umeda, from the Japanese Embassy in Burkina, in front of one of the limits of the land given by the village for the medical center.

We should have a final decision on the possibility to get funds from them by the end of February 2014.

blog-27-oct-2013-10

While we were walking in the fields, we found 2 little partridges. We let them go hoping their mother will find them. On the way back we stopped at a medical dispensary in the village of Sogosagasso. I have never seen anything this dirty.

Saturday morning we went with Umeda to visit 2 medical dispensaries (fortunately, these were very clean) and we made a quick tour of the LAP.

On Wednesday we went back to the village of Fina. We had to install some shelves at the nursery school and the tailors had to take the measurements of the kids for their uniforms.

blog-27-oct-2013-11

The 77 kids of the nursery school of Fina

blog-27-oct-2013-12 blog-27-oct-2013-13
Boys being measured Girls being measured

blog-27-oct-2013-14

Kids using the playground

Also on Saturday we went to the Muslim baptism of the daughter of Karim, manager of the agricultural social business.

blog-27-oct-2013-15 blog-27-oct-2013-16

blog-27-oct-2013-17

Mother, daughter and father smiling

African proverb:

A fool and water will go the way they are steered.

Un imbécile et l’eau iront de la façon qu’ils sont dirigés.

Have an excellent week.

Hervé

[:]

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